Archive for September, 2011


You may have seen this amazing time-lapse taken from the the International Space Station as it orbits our planet at night. We felt it could do with a soundtrack and who better to do it than our very own Everett Ruskin Esq. Turn the volume up and Enjoy!

Somebody just had way too much time in their hands…more here.

The Kepler orbiting observatory is specifically designed to find Earth-like planets around nearby stars.

Earlier this year, the Kepler team released the mission’s first 136 days of data and it has turned out to be a veritable jackpot. In that time Kepler looked at some 150,000 target stars and found evidence for 1,235 potential exoplanets. That’s quite a haul.

Since then, most of the work on this database has been to identify the characteristics of all these exoplanets. But such a large dataset also allows for statistical analyses too, from which various projections can be made. More here.

 

BGU researchers have today that they have discovered deep springs on the floor of the Dead Sea, which provide fresh water to the rapidly dwindling lake. Meanwhile, a parallel study by German researchers has found new forms of life growing around the fissures in the sea floor. The Dead Sea is shrinking as the water level drops at an alarming rate — about a meter a year. Israeli and German scientists have been researching groundwater springs which discharge from the sea floor to understand the impact of this process on this unique ecosystem. While the existence of springs has been known for decades as people observed ripples on the surface, the scientists have discovered deep springs not visible from shore.

UC Berkeley scientists have developed a system to capture visual activity in human brains and reconstruct it as digital video clips. Eventually, this process will allow you to record and reconstruct your own dreams on a computer screen.

The left clip is a segment of the movie that the subject viewed while in the magnet. The right clip shows the reconstruction of this movie from brain activity measured using fMRI. The reconstruction was obtained using only each subject’s brain activity and a library of 18 million seconds of random YouTube video

More here.

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